World Briefly for Tuesday

AP

The Latest: Turkish president says peace process with Kurds can't advance during attacks

BRUSSELS (AP) — The Latest from NATO meeting on Islamic State group and related developments (all times local):

11:20 a.m.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan says Turkey is asking NATO to be prepared to help his country as it battles Islamic State militants in Syria and Kurdish rebels in Iraq.

Speaking at a news conference Tuesday before leaving for China, Erdogan also said it was impossible to advance a peace process with the Kurds as attacks on Turkey continue.

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Libyan court sentences Gadhafi's son, Seif al-Islam, to death over killings in 2011 uprising

TRIPOLI, Libya (AP) — A court in Libya's capital sentenced a son of Moammar Gadhafi to death in absentia on Tuesday over killings during the country's 2011 uprising.

The Tripoli court that sentenced Seif al-Islam, who is being held by a militia that refuses to hand him over to the central government, also sentenced to death eight others, including former Libyan spy chief Abdullah al-Senoussi. It was unclear whether the sentences would be carried out.

Libya has slid into chaos since the overthrow and killing of Gadhafi. It is now bitterly divided between an elected parliament and government cornered in the country's east, with little power on the ground, and an Islamist militia-backed government in the west that has seized Tripoli.

Since the end of the civil war, Seif al-Islam has been held by a militia in Zintan, which is allied with the Tobruk-based internationally recognized government against the Tripoli one. He is also wanted by the International Criminal Court in The Hague on charges of crimes against humanity.

Charges in the trial included recruiting mercenaries who were given Libyan nationality, planning and carrying out attacks on civilian targets from the air, forming armed groups and shooting into crowds of demonstrators.

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10 Things to Know for Today

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

1. NATO MEETS IN EMERGENCY SESSION

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan says Turkey is asking the alliance to be prepared to help his country as it battles Islamic State militants in Syria and Kurdish rebels in Iraq.

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Obama closes Africa trip with first speech to African Union by sitting American president

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia (AP) — President Barack Obama highlighted his administration's efforts to combat hunger worldwide on Tuesday as he prepared to end a historic return to the land of his father's birth with a speech to the African Union.

Obama toured a plant operated by Faffa Foods, which participates in the U.S. Feed the Future program. The initiative focuses on helping smaller farmers in 19 countries, including Ethiopia and 11 other African nations, grow their businesses.

Faffa, in the Ethiopian capital, is the chief supplier of baby food for children in Ethiopia, where child malnutrition is a serious problem.

Obama said the "huge percentage" Africans who still get their income from agriculture can improve their yields with a few interventions. He said a woman he met at the factory had increased her yield threefold, providing enough money for her to buy a cow and send her children to school.

He said Feed the Future "is making a difference in some very concrete ways."

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At Shiite militia 'summer camps', Iraqi children undergo training to fight Islamic State

BAGHDAD (AP) — A quiet middle-class Shiite neighborhood in western Baghdad was transformed recently into a mini-boot camp, training teenagers for battle against the Islamic State group.

The Shiite boys and young men ran through its normally placid streets carrying out mock exercises for urban warfare since the toughest battles against the Sunni extremists are likely to involve street fighting. They were taught how to hold, control and aim light weapons, though they didn't fire them.

In cities from Baghdad to Basra, summer camps set up by the Popular Mobilization Forces, Iraq's largest militia umbrella group, are training teens and boys as young as middle school age after the country's top Shiite cleric issued an edict calling on students to use their school vacations to prepare for battle if they are needed.

With dozens of such camps around the country, hundreds of students have gone through the training though it is impossible to say how many went on to fight the Sunni extremists since those who do so go independently. Of around 200 cadets in a training class visited by The Associated Press, about half were under the age of 18, with some as young as 15. Several said they intended to join their fathers and older brothers on the front lines.

It's yet another way minors are being dragged into Iraq's brutal war as the military, Shiite militias and Kurdish fighters battle to take back territory from Islamic State militants, who seized much of the country's north and west over the past year. The Sunni extremists have aggressively enlisted children as young as 10 for combat, as suicide bombers and as executioners in their horrifying videos.

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5 things to consider as Trump dangles 3rd party prospect while saying he's staying in GOP game

WASHINGTON (AP) — A lot of Republicans would like Donald Trump to go away. But not too far.

The prospect that Trump might eventually leave the primaries and run for president on his own has started to cast a shadow on the race, reviving memories of Ross Perot, Ralph Nader and the chills their third-party campaigns gave to Republicans and Democrats in turn.

To Republican pollster Frank Luntz, a third-party Trump campaign would mean, quite simply, "President Hillary Clinton." Democratic strategist Maria Cardona, who is close to the Clinton campaign, agrees: "He's the greatest gift we have."

Not all Republicans foresee the apocalypse if Trump goes rogue. But they're worried just the same. The party's best bet may be to see him ground down in the GOP contest with the hope his supporters will disperse to others in the field. Trump calls an independent run "highly unlikely" but it depends "how well I'm treated" by party leaders.

Here are five things to consider as Trump refuses to rule out a third-party effort.

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Boy Scouts of America to allow gay adult leaders; church-run units can keep the exclusion

NEW YORK (AP) — The Boy Scouts of America has ended its blanket ban on gay adult leaders but will allow church-sponsored Scout units to maintain the exclusion for religious reasons.

The new policy, aimed at easing a controversy that has embroiled the Boy Scouts for years, takes effect immediately. It was approved Monday by the BSA's National Executive Board on a 45-12 vote during a closed-to-the-media teleconference.

"For far too long this issue has divided and distracted us," the BSA's president, former Defense Secretary Robert Gates, said. "Now it's time to unite behind our shared belief in the extraordinary power of Scouting to be a force for good."

Initial reactions to the decision from groups on both sides suggested the issue would remain divisive.

The Mormon church, which sponsors more Scout units that any other organization, said it was "deeply troubled" by the decision. Church officials suggested they would look into the possibility of forming their own organization to replace Boy Scouts.

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Movie theater shooting: No red flags reported in man's background check at time of gun sale

CARROLLTON, Ga. (AP) — John Russell Houser's mental problems were well known to many, though perhaps not to the store that sold him the .40-caliber handgun used in a deadly attack on a Louisiana movie theater. A federal background check came back clean, the pawn shop said, with no red flags raised at the time of sale.

Yet Houser's own family worried he was dangerous in 2008 and sought court protection. His wife was so worried that she removed his guns from their home, her attorney said. A probate judge in Georgia signed an order allowing sheriff's deputies to detain Houser and bring him to a hospital for a mental evaluation.

But the judge who ordered Houser detained said Monday that she did not — and legally could not — have him involuntarily committed. That may explain why he was able to legally purchase the gun used to kill Jillian Johnson and Mayci Marie Breaux in a theater in Lafayette. He wounded nine others before killing himself.

Houser's case underscores concerns raised in the aftermath of other mass shootings involving suspects with mental health issues — and the gaps in the system meant to "red-flag" people ill-suited to own or carry a firearm.

Funeral services for Johnson and Breaux were held Monday. Johnson was remembered as an artist who worked to beautify her neighborhood while Breaux was looking forward to a new job and married life with a longtime boyfriend.

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After 4th night of search, few clues on what happened to 2 teens who set out on fishing trip

JUPITER, Fla. (AP) — Rescuers endured a fourth night of an anxious search for two young Floridians born and bred as boaters who went missing on the high seas.

The Coast Guard scoured an area the size of West Virginia with no sign of the boaters by early Tuesday. The 14-year-old boys' vessel was found capsized two days earlier. But relatives and friends of the teens were clinging to hope that the expertise they acquired boating and fishing in their short lives was enough to keep them alive while apparently lost in the Atlantic.

"This isn't something that he's new at," said Carly Black, the mother of Austin Stephanos, in an interview with television station WPBF. "I think they feel better on the boat than they do on land."

The mother said she wouldn't even "bat an eye" about the boys' ability to survive at sea.

Nick Korniloff, stepfather of the other teen, Perry Cohen, said the boys had been "raised on the water," knew how to navigate safely, and were more passionate about the sea than anything else.

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Satirical Broadway musical 'The Book of Mormon' finally comes to heart of Mormonlandia

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — The biting satirical musical that mocks Mormons has finally come to the heart of Mormonlandia, starting a sold-out, two-week run Tuesday at a Salt Lake City theater two blocks from the church's flagship temple and headquarters.

The Tony Award-winning "The Book of Mormon" has earned rave reviews while appalling some with its crudeness. But this will mark the first time the show's gleefully naive missionaries come to Utah, where about two-thirds of residents are estimated to be Mormon.

The show's creators, Trey Parker and Matt Stone of "South Park" fame, told The Associated Press that bringing the show to Salt Lake City feels like validation, and also brings the creative process full circle.

Parker and Stone used to "trip out" on Mormon stuff while taking Temple Square tours in the 1990s. They made their first research trip for the show to Salt Lake City with fellow creator Bobby Lopez in the mid-2000s. They waited to bring the show to Salt Lake City until they were invited by a theater.

"It feels like a really cool thing that it finally gets to play Salt Lake City," Stone said. "It just feels very much like it's coming home."

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